Words from our TMJ Expert: How do we treat Idiopathic Condylar Resorption?

Words from our TMJ Expert:  How do we treat Idiopathic Condylar Resorption?

Idiopathic condylar resorption (ICR) is a well-documented but poorly understood progressive disease that affects the Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ). ICR may result in malocclusion, facial disfigurement, TMJ dysfunction, and pain. The condition most often occurs in teenage girls, but can occur at any age, although rarely over the age of 40 years. These patients have a common facial morphology including: (1) high occlusal and mandibular plane angles, (2) progressively retruding mandible, and (3) Class II occlusion with or without open bite. Imaging usually demonstrates small resorbing condyles and TMJ articular disk dislocations.

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Technical Notes from Mike:  The Detrimental Effects of Forward Head Posture on Neck Pain, Headaches, and Temporomandibular Dysfunction

Technical Notes from Mike:  The Detrimental Effects of Forward Head Posture on Neck Pain, Headaches, and Temporomandibular Dysfunction

In addition to helping our patients recover, we should empower them with information so they may best understand their musculoskeletal dysfunctions and contribute to their wellness. The following is a technical explanation regarding why treating forward head posture is essential in helping patients with neck pain, headaches and TMD. I look forward to your responses and collaboration.

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Ring in the NEW EAR!

Ring in the NEW EAR!

Tinnitus is commonly defined in my profession as the perception of a sound in the absence of an external sound source. In essence, it’s hearing something that isn’t actually there, and is often described by patients as ringing in their ears. Because tinnitus may arise from so many conditions, ranging from hearing loss to high blood pressure to medications, diagnosing the cause or causes can be a challenge. For many people, the ringing begins...

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To Click or Not to Click, that is the question!

To Click or Not to Click, that is the question!

One of the most common complaints I hear from temporomandibular joint (TMJ) patients is that their jaw will “pop” or “click”. In many cases, the popping or clicking is harmless, painless and does not impair function. Patients ask, if it is more of an annoyance than anything else, should anything be done about it? The general consensus is to monitor the popping and clicking either with a dentist or physical therapist to make sure range of motion...

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